Bicycling

Asbury Park Bike Share

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Bicycling is a sustainable, fun and healthy way to move about the City of Asbury Park.  The City of Asbury Park is making an effort to better balance the use of its streets and to incorporate bicycle facilities to incentivize more people to ride!  The greater number of cyclists, the more familiarized drivers will become with bicyclists sharing the streets.  Plus, riding a bike reduces the demand for parking in the City.  

Bicycles are permitted on the Asbury Park Boardwalk between 10pm and 10am year-round.

February 2017 - The City has installed 10 more bike racks downtown.  In addition, 44 more bike racks will be installed at the Asbury Park Boardwalk.  The first bike corral will be installed in the City this spring as well

March 2017 - An RFP has been released for a vendor to install, operate and maintain a City-wide bikeshare system.

April 2017 - The City has selected Zagster to install, operate and maintain the bike share system, which is anticipated to launch in Summer 2017.  The first two bike corrals have been installed on Cookman Avenue and Emory Street.  NJDOT has granted the City of Asbury Park a Local Technical Assistance award to create a Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan!

June 2017 - 44 bike racks have been installed at the Boardwalk.

August 2017 - Asbury Park Bike Share has launched!  For more information, visit bike.zagster.com/asburypark.

The Asbury Park Police Department has launched a free, voluntary bicycle registration program.  

Registration Form - Email to appdbikeregistration@cityofasburypark.com.

Bicycle Facilities Map

Bike Parking Tips

Frequently Asked Questions

Should bikes ride with or against traffic?
You must ride in the same direction as cars. A bicyclist has the same rights and duties as motorists, including stopping at red lights and stop signs.

Where should I ride if there is no shoulder or bike lane and the travel lane is too narrow to share?
Many streets in Asbury Park are narrow and may not provide enough space for a motor vehicle to safely pass a bicycle. On these narrower streets, a bicyclist can actually “take the lane”, i.e., position themselves at or near the center of the lane. In this way, motorists will see you and not be invited to unsafely squeeze by in the same lane.

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